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There’s a trowel on tap at the bar! We’re archaeologizing the city!

There’s a trowel on tap at the bar! We’re archaeologizing the city!

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There are fluted chocolate Clovis points, I repeat chocolate lithics!

There are fluted chocolate Clovis points, I repeat chocolate lithics!

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First pun of the day

"Conclusions: Ridin’ Cherty"- Josh Keddy

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Just a small reminder!

The CAAs start today! I’ll be there soon, hopefully to soak up some awesome archaeological knowledge. If I can I’ll draw a tumblr “t” or something on my name tag so anyone else there can find me, if not I’ll be the blonde in the black dress (I know, very specific haha).

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kaniehtiio:

For thousands of years, we told stories from one generation to the next. Our stories help us to understand how the world is ordered and our place within it. But what good are old stories if the wisdom they contain is not shared?

In Never Alone, players take on the roles of Nuna, a young Iñupiaq girl and an Arctic fox, in an atmospheric puzzle platformer that combines traditional folklore, stories, settings, and characters handed down over many generations by Alaska Native people whose roots and heritage date back millennia. 

Featuring imagery and themes drawn directly from Iñupiat and other Alaska Native cultures, Never Alone features striking visuals, emphasizes the sensibilities and perspective of these indigenous Arctic people and requires players to work cooperatively to succeed in challenging and harsh environments. [x]

I am VERY into this and can’t wait to play it.

(via valdanderthal)

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thefortmuseum:

Not just buffalo were stampeded off of cliffs and canyons by First Nations people, but pronghorn antelope as well.  Image is of an ancient pronghorn hunting trap. The map is of stone drive lanes in Southeast Alberta and the photograph at right is of archaeologists mapping a pronghorn drive lane north of the Red Deer River.
To learn about the past 10,000 years of hunting in Alberta check out albertahistoricplaces.wordpress.com. 

thefortmuseum:

Not just buffalo were stampeded off of cliffs and canyons by First Nations people, but pronghorn antelope as well.  Image is of an ancient pronghorn hunting trap. The map is of stone drive lanes in Southeast Alberta and the photograph at right is of archaeologists mapping a pronghorn drive lane north of the Red Deer River.

To learn about the past 10,000 years of hunting in Alberta check out albertahistoricplaces.wordpress.com. 

(via oosik)

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sc-archaeology:

The Third Annual meeting of the Southeastern Conference on Historic Sites Archaeology (SECHSA) will be held September 19-20, 2014 in Stone Mountain, Georgia. The conference theme “Looking In, Looking Out” considers the interplay between localities and broader regions. Individual papers, symposia,…

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smoecrab:

Find of the day! #archaeology #crm #projectilepoint #artifact (at Osceola National Forest)

smoecrab:

Find of the day! #archaeology #crm #projectilepoint #artifact (at Osceola National Forest)

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anthmusings:

If you’re British or thinking of studying in Britain and are considering anthropology degrees, check out our league tables as rated by the Guardian. The ratings are based on satisfaction, student staff ratio, spending per student, and whether students found a career within 6 months after graduating. 

Hopefully this may help someone out!

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"The culture of a people is an ensemble of texts, themselves ensembles, which the anthropologist strains to read over the shoulders of those to whom they properly belong."

— Clifford Geertz (1973: 452)

(Source: akitla)

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"…ethnicity is created by contact, not by isolation."

— Eriksen, T.H. (2010 ed.) Small Places, Large Issues. London: Pluto Press [p. 303] (via anthmusings)

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theolduvaigorge:

Fluted point manufacture in eastern North America: an assessment of form and technology using traditional metrics and 3D digital morphometrics

  • by Joseph A. M. Gingerich, Sabrina B. Sholts, Sebastian K. T. S. Wärmländer and Dennis Stanford

 Differences in Paleoindian projectile point morphology have previously been used to define technologies, infer colonization patterns, propose chronological and regional boundaries. In this study, we evaluate the effectiveness of traditional linear measurements and ratios, flake scar angles, and 3D model-based flake contours for the statistical differentiation of projectile point type(s) and reduction technique. Sixty-three fluted bifaces from eastern North America and fourteen replicate Clovis points are analyzed. Discriminant analysis shows that 3D model-based Fourier descriptors of flake scar contours are less successful than traditional metrics in correctly differentiating styles, but more successful in identifying individual knappers. Changes in the symmetry of front and back flake scars between Clovis and later fluted point styles indicate a possible shift in reduction techniques. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of both traditional and modern morphometric variables to quantify biface morphology, and address questions about social interaction and technological change in Pleistocene North America” (read more/open access).

(Open access source: World Archaeology 46(1):101-122, 2014 via Academia.edu)

(via openaccessarchaeology)

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strangeremains:

Why do disarticulated feet in sneakers frequently wash ashore?
When a dead body ends up in water (whether by murder, accident, or suicide) the hands and feet easily detach from the arms and legs as the body decomposes, because, compared to the rest of the body, the muscle attachments to the limbs are relatively weak.
If that body is fully clothed and dumped wearing sneakers, from time to time the feet will wash ashore completely articulated in shores.  The most famous case of this happened between 2007  and 2011, when a dozen human feet washed ashore in the Pacific Northwest.  At the time, there were a number of theories about the origin of the decomposed feet: they belonged to murder victims, they belonged to plane crash fatalities, or they were victims of the 2004 tsunami.  But investigators from British Columbia and Washington State were able to confirm that most of these feet found on beaches from Washington Vancouver belonged to people who either committed suicide, died of natural causes, or were the victims of an accident.
Forensic investigators believe that the reason why decayed feet entombed in sneakers or hiking boots can survive intact in lakes or oceans is that the thick shoes protect them from the ocean environment and prevent fish from feeding on them.  Some investigators argue that the shoes are also the reason the feet wash ashore because of the buoyancy of the shoe, which is lightweight and rubber-soled.
Read more at Strange Remains
Image Credit: ABC

strangeremains:

Why do disarticulated feet in sneakers frequently wash ashore?

When a dead body ends up in water (whether by murder, accident, or suicide) the hands and feet easily detach from the arms and legs as the body decomposes, because, compared to the rest of the body, the muscle attachments to the limbs are relatively weak.

If that body is fully clothed and dumped wearing sneakers, from time to time the feet will wash ashore completely articulated in shores.  The most famous case of this happened between 2007  and 2011, when a dozen human feet washed ashore in the Pacific Northwest.  At the time, there were a number of theories about the origin of the decomposed feet: they belonged to murder victims, they belonged to plane crash fatalities, or they were victims of the 2004 tsunami.  But investigators from British Columbia and Washington State were able to confirm that most of these feet found on beaches from Washington Vancouver belonged to people who either committed suicide, died of natural causes, or were the victims of an accident.

Forensic investigators believe that the reason why decayed feet entombed in sneakers or hiking boots can survive intact in lakes or oceans is that the thick shoes protect them from the ocean environment and prevent fish from feeding on them.  Some investigators argue that the shoes are also the reason the feet wash ashore because of the buoyancy of the shoe, which is lightweight and rubber-soled.

Read more at Strange Remains

Image Credit: ABC

(via theladygoogle)

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theolduvaigorge:

Seriously Amazing Women: Dr. Briana Pobiner

This article is part of the Seriously Amazing Women series of interviews with women curators and scientists in the Department of Anthropology of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. The interviews were conducted during March 2014 in honor of Women’s History Month (#WomensHistoryMonth on Twitter). 

  • interview by Meghan Mulkerin (Collections Specialist and Research Contractor) with Dr. Briana Pobiner (Research Scientist and Museum Educator for the Human Origins Program)

When you’ve been around the Natural History Museum any time at all, you realize that most  people have been here for more than 20 years. What can we say; people love it here and stay! We have phenomenally productive staff members who have worked with the Smithsonian for over 40 years, and since scientific knowledge is cumulative and is the work of a lifetime, this is a great thing. Dr. Briana Pobiner is a part of a new generation of anthropologists in the museum. In her eight years at NMNH, she has brought scientifically valuable collections to the museum, continued important research on the evolution of the human diet, been an integral part of the team that put up the Human Origins exhibit, and made an impact in public science education!  

Dr. Pobiner currently is directing a really cool NSF-funded project to provide teachers and students with better materials that use human examples to teach evolution in Advanced Placement high school biology classes; she hopes to expand to general biology since that is the last time many adults will learn about evolution during their formal education! Briana is also the mom of an adorable two-year old, named Toby (Tobias Rex), and I was eager to hear her perspective on this recent life change and how she was balancing family with work-life. Briana and her husband have a lot in common; he is also very involved with biology and teaches human and animal skeletal anatomy, physiology and histology. Little T. Rex is quickly learning that mommy and daddy work with bones, and was very excited about his namesake arriving at the museum on April 15th!” (read more).

(Source: Rogers Archaeology Lab)

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thejunglenook:

truth.