Quote
"The materiality of the material world and of the workaday world is far too easily taken for granted, especially in societies with advanced technology. What is required now as the world lurches toward ecological and political self-destruction is continuous surprise as to the material facts of Being."

— Michael Taussig 2004

Quote
"Narratives can make us understand. Photographs do something else: they haunt us."

— Michael Shanks 1997, Photography and archaeology

Link

Health specialists work in an isolation ward for patients in Guékedou, southern Guinea.

Quote
"Just forget that you guys are archaeologists and try to pretend to be normal human beings for a second!"

— My anthropology professor, when discussing cognition.

Video

Junko Habo: Prehistoric Japan

UC Berkeley anthropologist, Junko Habo discusses the early prehistory of Japan, including the enduring Jomon Period and the potential of agriculture.

Link

Laura Nader is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. Nader’s current work focuses on how central dogmas are made and how they work in law, energy science, and anthropology. Harmony, Ideology, Injustice and Control in a Mountain Zapotec Village (1990) and The Life of the Law: Anthropological Projects (2002) indicate a wide range of interests in law that has moved from village sites into national and international arenas. Essays in Controlling Processes (1994, 1996, 2002) is an ongoing work that attempts to synthesize contemporary work on power and control. In 2008 Plunder – When the Rule of Law is Illegal was co-authored with Ugo Mattei. In 2012 she published Culture and Dignity: Dialogues Between the Middle East and the West (see book review here) in which she questions apparent clashes between human groups and she clenches the hybrid cultural dimension in which we all live.

Text

Help!

Hey everyone,

I teach an undergrad tutorial (as many of you know) and next week we are starting on biological/evolutionary anthropology. I like to play funny, anthro themed videos before class starts while I wait for all the students to file into the classroom. Next week we’re looking at human, ancestral and primate skulls and talking about the creation of cladograms. If anyone know of any funny or clever videos related to human evolution or early human ancestors SEND THEM MY WAY, please and thanks :) You can reblog this, or send me an ask or email me at zomganthro@gmail.com

I also send funny meme macros to my students when I’m emailing them course content so if you know of any funny ones, also feel free to send them my way.

Thanks :)

Cheers,

Zomganthro

(related: I’m also looking for funny videos related to writing essays so send those to me too!)

Video

Tsimshian community curator Lindsey Martin discusses the significance of an Amiilk (portrait mask). She speaks about the portrait mask in terms of feasting and identity. 

Text

People who don’t understand anthropology yet complain about the discipline: I’m sorry. I just CAN’T. If I have to explain to one more person about how anthropology is NOT the study of the “other” anymore, or how anthropology is NOT about pseudo-colonial development projects I’m going to scream. Ruth Benedict was incredibly correct when she said that the role of anthropology was to make the world safe for human differences. If you don’t think that anthropology is a feminist ally, I’ll direct you to my copious amounts of anthropologist friends who are working on issues of gender equality, feminist representations and rape culture. If you think that anthropologists ignore queer issues, I implore you to speak to my (both straight and queer) friends who are tackling research projects, both in Canada and abroad, that involve LGBT issues and historical perspectives. If you think that anthropology is racist, I’m just going to roll my eyes and ask if you’ve read anything written in the last two decades. Like, almost ANYTHING. As with any discipline, we have some  problematic researchers attempting to work within the discipline, but anthropology is inherently open to human differences. In fact, I think anthropology works to both celebrate and normalize them.

No more anonymous, aggressive and threatening PMs, ok?

Link

commiekinkshamer:

also lol at ppl who think archaeology is less racist than socio-cultural anthropology

  • archaeologists have a long history of destroying or purposefully misrepresenting monuments and artifacts built by people of colour because it’d be too shocking to acknowledge white people didn’t invent them

I’m not going to respond to all of this, but I am going to make a few comments. Full disclosure: I’m an archaeologist, but I’m an archaeologist with a heavy base in anthropological theory and a second degree in international development studies. I think that all anthropologists MUST realize that we stand on the shoulders of racists. That is the history of our discipline. That is something we contend with and attempt to remedy every day of our anthropological lives!

That being said, it find it incredibly tacky and unproductive to try and call one sub-discipline more racist than another one. We are community and a family and we must operate as a unit, rather than throw each other under the metaphorical bus. All of the points raised in this post have a grain of truth to them, mostly in a historical sense but no GOOD archaeologist does those things. Archaeologists who engaged/currently engages in those practices are not really archaeologists at all, they are treasure hunters and professional racists. What I’m trying to say is anthropology has a history of racism and colonial thinking but our job as anthropologists is to STOP that way of thinking and IMPROVE our discipline. And if you ask me, personally, I think we’re doing a hell of a job.

Quote
"History is one way of “sciencing”"

— Leslie A. White (1945) History, Evolution and Functionalism: Three Types of Interpretation of Culture

Text

(Free Talk) Got Anthropology Presents: Travis Steffens

Hi everyone!

If you happen to be in, or around Toronto today I highly suggest you come see this month’s Got Anthropology speaker, Travis Steffens. Travis is an anthropologist, primatologist, explorer, and all around awesome dude!

image

Hectares of forest go up in flames, all lemur species are now threatened with extinction and people live in poverty. The situation in Madagascar seems bleak but through collaboration with local communities one Anthropologist feels that there is light at the end of the tunnel. Come join Explorer-in-Residence Travis Steffens as he shares his experiences as an Anthropologist turned conservationist working in remote regions of Madagascar.”

Where: 150 College St, room 103

When: TONIGHT AT 7:30pm

Why: Because LEMURS that’s why! Also, I’ll be there.

visit the facebook event for more information: https://www.facebook.com/events/371212926348650/

image

As always, the event is free and there will be food!!!

Photo
Google doodle for Dian Fossey’s 82 birthday!

Google doodle for Dian Fossey’s 82 birthday!

Text

still on hiatus

 Probably until the new year (I have SO much marking). But just a reminder that the Holiday Card Exchange has reached it’s time limit. Make sure to check the post to see who reblogged directly after you and send them an ask for their address:

http://zomganthro.tumblr.com/post/67890431733/the-official-tumblr-anthro-community-holiday-card

Have fun and be safe! I’ll see you in 2014 (if not sooner)!

Cheers,

Zomganthro

Video

Is the Man who is Tall Happy? a film by Michel Gondry about his conversations with Noam Chomsky